Banned Books Week 2014: Celebrating the Freedom to Read

Banned Book Week is September 21-27 this year.

bannedIf you’ve been in the library this week, you may have noticed a display of books that have their titles blacked out. This isn’t a mistake; they represent the banning or challenging of books from school and public libraries across the country.

 

According to the American Library Association, Banned Books Week is “an annual event celebrating the freedom to read. Typically held during the last week of September, it highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community –- librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types –- in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

By focusing on efforts across the country to remove or restrict access to books, Banned Books Week draws national attention to the harms of censorship. Check out the frequently challenged books section to explore the issues and controversies around book challenges and book banning. The books featured during Banned Books Week have all been targeted with removal or restrictions in libraries and schools. While books have been and continue to be banned, part of the Banned Books Week celebration is the fact that, in a majority of cases, the books have remained available. This happens only thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who stand up and speak out for the freedom to read.”

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Why do books get banned or challenged?

“Frequently, challenges are motivated by the desire to protect children. While the intent is commendable, this method of protection contains hazards far greater than exposure to the “evil” against which it is leveled…

U.S. Supreme Court Justice William Brennan, in Texas v. Johnson, said, “If there is a bedrock principle underlying the First Amendment, it is that the Government may not prohibit the expression of an idea simply because society finds the idea itself offensive or disagreeable.” Individuals may restrict what they themselves or their children read, but they must not call on governmental or public agencies to prevent others from reading or viewing that material. The challenges documented in this list are not brought by people merely expressing a point of view; rather, they represent requests to remove materials from schools or libraries, thus restricting access to them by others. Even when the eventual outcome allows the book to stay on the library shelves and even when the person is a lone protester, the censorship attempt is real. Someone has tried to restrict another person’s ability to choose. Challenges are as important to document as actual bans, in which a book is removed from the shelves of a library or bookstore or from the curriculum at a school. Attempts to censor can lead to voluntary restriction of expression by those who seek to avoid controversy; in these cases, material may not be published at all or may not be purchased by a bookstore, library, or school district.¹”

 

Quiz: What do you think was the MOST challenged book of 2013?

 

Click Here for Answer
CAPTAIN UNDERPANTS!

 

What Can You Do to Help?

Stay informed. Join your local library. Read a banned or challenged book. Participate in Banned Books Week! Keep reading! 

¹ Doyle, Robert P. “Books Challenged or Banned: 2012-2013.” Illinois Library Association (2013).Web. 27 Sept. 2013. <http://www.ila.org/BannedBooks/BBW_2012-2013_Shortlist.pdf>.

 

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